Next up in our DEFINED series: Event and Wedding Packages! As a reminder: Team JKE is breaking down wedding and event industry concepts for you including defining wedding terminology, industry inside information, myth busting of common event planning mysteries, and more!

The first week of the new year, we are talking about Wedding and Event Packages! Clients choose to get planners for multiple reasons: Peace of mind. Organization. Industry expertise. Time saving. But how do you decide exactly what you need from an event planner?

Most couples start with small ideas for event design, what kind of experience they want, what work they want to do and don’t want to do, etc. When a potential clients approaches and says “How much do you charge?” I ask them: For what? LOL. It’s not meant to be sassy, but there are levels to event planning. I offer several services that meet different needs which is why I offer Free Consultations, so I can understand your vision better and how I can help. Today, I will explain standard event packages so you can be equipped with where your event planning needs fall as you interview event planners.

DEFINED: Event and Wedding Packages

Jazmine Karess Events, Planner, DC Planner, Wedding Planner Washington DC, Virgina Wedding Planner, Virginia Wedding, DC Wedding, Event Designer

Here are the standard event packages:

  • Day-of-Coordination: This is actually a laymen’s term as most event planners, including myself, do not use it. Day of Coordination is confusing to couples. You need someone who sets up the event that you’ve planned all the details for. A planner actually comes in well over a month in advance to coordinate between vendors for the big day. They do not show up literally the day of which is why planners have steered away from this term. If you see a planner using the terms Event Day Management, Wedding Day Management, or Month-of-Coordination then this is what that means.
  • Partial Planning : This is Event Day Management mixed with a splash of full service. For example: A client needs event day management, but also has about 5 vendors that they need assistance with. The planner is not doing complete full-service because you only need a few additional items beyond event day management so they offer you partial planning services.
  • Full Service: The planner uses their industry expertise and your vision to create the entire wedding experience. Design, decor, logistics, you name it! Top to bottom planning. The full shebang! The whole oyster! You get it.
  • Themed Packages: This is the easiest to spot because it is pretty specific. Micro-Wedding, Baby Showers, Birthday Parties, Corporate Events, etc. These packages are tailored towards specific, non-wedding events or small wedding events and will spell out exactly what is involved in the services.
  • Design Only: Self-explanatory. The planner creates, develops, and implements the design elements of the wedding ONLY. The only logistics they coordinate with those related to the design elements.

Upsell/Downsell

As a planner my primary job is not designing, or working logistics: it’s to educate. As an industry expert I can spot immediately when a potential client needs more services, or less. When a client says they want a Day of Coordinator, yet they express a need for pulling off their “romantic” wedding design and still have a few vendors they need help with, they need more services. On the contrary, if a client comes to me for full service, but has every vendor booked and their designs prepared, they do not need me for full service. I say this to say, an upsell is not always bad, nor is it a salesman move. An experienced planner can read between the lines and understand that you may have additional needs. The goal is to make sure you have the services and guidance for everything you need!

Rule of Thumb: Always ask for clarification! Make a list of what you need and see how the services match up!

Check out the DEFINED Series!

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